31st May 2012

Photo reblogged from Good Reason News with 26,912 notes

goodreasonnews:

igotkittypryde:

I liked this quote so much I made this thing.

 “It’s called being part of a society. Not everything goes your way. I don’t let my kids eat ice cream every night. They wish I did, but even they know: that doesn’t make me the Hitler of ice cream

goodreasonnews:

igotkittypryde:

I liked this quote so much I made this thing.

“It’s called being part of a society. Not everything goes your way. I don’t let my kids eat ice cream every night. They wish I did, but even they know: that doesn’t make me the Hitler of ice cream

Source: igotkittypryde

31st May 2012

Photo reblogged from Old School FRP with 35 notes

oldschoolfrp:

I always liked this early Larry Elmore D&D illustration.  Is she alone or part of a larger ambushing party?  An elf, ranger, or thief?  I want to grab some dice and play out her story.
I still don’t think I would let an orc ride a horse in a typical D&D game, at least not a calm and cooperative horse.  This was one of the first times I realized that we all know what an orc is, but we are all thinking of something slightly different.
(From the article “Aiming for realism in archery”, Dragon magazine #58, February 1982.)

oldschoolfrp:

I always liked this early Larry Elmore D&D illustration.  Is she alone or part of a larger ambushing party?  An elf, ranger, or thief?  I want to grab some dice and play out her story.

I still don’t think I would let an orc ride a horse in a typical D&D game, at least not a calm and cooperative horse.  This was one of the first times I realized that we all know what an orc is, but we are all thinking of something slightly different.

(From the article “Aiming for realism in archery”, Dragon magazine #58, February 1982.)

31st May 2012

Photo reblogged from Tea Party Jesus with 378 notes

31st May 2012

Video reblogged from kevin w murphy with 372 notes

kwmurphy:

I never much liked this song until now.  John Smith, from his new album Eavesdropping.  

31st May 2012

Photo reblogged from Life is calling. How far will you go? with 49 notes

peacecorps:

In honor of our ONE YEAR TUMBLRVERSARY this week we are reblogging some of our favorite posts from the past year that you may have missed if you just joined us. This is one of our favorite photos from our Digital Library that we shared back in June!
(via Lesotho - 2007)

peacecorps:

In honor of our ONE YEAR TUMBLRVERSARY this week we are reblogging some of our favorite posts from the past year that you may have missed if you just joined us. This is one of our favorite photos from our Digital Library that we shared back in June!

(via Lesotho - 2007)

31st May 2012

Photo reblogged from little rich girl with 54,569 notes

31st May 2012

Photo reblogged from Love Puppy with 10,393 notes

noraleah:

I knew I liked this woman.

Elizabeth Banks: I Thank Birth Control Pills for My Son
Just over a year ago, my son Felix was born via gestational surrogacy. He came out of me nine months early and because of my broken belly, his babycake was baked in a wonderful angel’s oven and now — I can’t believe it — he’s a year old and walking. He has expanded my capacity for joy a thousand-fold.
His life would have been much harder to come by if not for the birth control pill. How’s that, you ask? Well, it’s a simple fact: The pill is used for many situations that have nothing to do with the prevention of pregnancy. The pill was prescribed to me when hormonally induced migraines kept me locked up in dark rooms for days at a time. It was prescribed to me to regulate insanely painful cramps every month — cramps so painful that I often vomited.
And here’s a little secret I am happy to blow the lid off of: The pill is often prescribed during the IVF (in vitro fertilization) process to help MAKE BABIES! That’s right, women dealing with infertility are often put on the pill to help regulate a cycle so that they might have a more successful IVF. The pill is used to manage ovarian cysts, endometriosis and other conditions too. Not to mention, it helps couples plan for wanted children.
Obviously, I’m not a doctor. I’m just a woman grateful for my necessary and very helpful medication. And I’m sure glad I don’t have to discuss any of these conditions, including infertility, with my employer.
A girlfriend and I recently wondered what would be more mortifying: having to tell her male employer she needed birth control to mitigate a heavy flow or just bleeding all over herself in the office?
So with that image in mind, I encourage all women — and the men in their lives — to protect access to birth control, and encourage our politicians to take women’s health issues out of the political process.
For more information, please visit the most comprehensive and willing advocates for women’s health in America: www.plannedparenthood.org.

noraleah:

I knew I liked this woman.

Elizabeth Banks: I Thank Birth Control Pills for My Son

Just over a year ago, my son Felix was born via gestational surrogacy. He came out of me nine months early and because of my broken belly, his babycake was baked in a wonderful angel’s oven and now — I can’t believe it — he’s a year old and walking. He has expanded my capacity for joy a thousand-fold.

His life would have been much harder to come by if not for the birth control pill. How’s that, you ask? Well, it’s a simple fact: The pill is used for many situations that have nothing to do with the prevention of pregnancy. The pill was prescribed to me when hormonally induced migraines kept me locked up in dark rooms for days at a time. It was prescribed to me to regulate insanely painful cramps every month — cramps so painful that I often vomited.

And here’s a little secret I am happy to blow the lid off of: The pill is often prescribed during the IVF (in vitro fertilization) process to help MAKE BABIES! That’s right, women dealing with infertility are often put on the pill to help regulate a cycle so that they might have a more successful IVF. The pill is used to manage ovarian cysts, endometriosis and other conditions too. Not to mention, it helps couples plan for wanted children.

Obviously, I’m not a doctor. I’m just a woman grateful for my necessary and very helpful medication. And I’m sure glad I don’t have to discuss any of these conditions, including infertility, with my employer.

A girlfriend and I recently wondered what would be more mortifying: having to tell her male employer she needed birth control to mitigate a heavy flow or just bleeding all over herself in the office?

So with that image in mind, I encourage all women — and the men in their lives — to protect access to birth control, and encourage our politicians to take women’s health issues out of the political process.

For more information, please visit the most comprehensive and willing advocates for women’s health in America: www.plannedparenthood.org.

Source: judygrimes

31st May 2012

Photo reblogged from The Economist with 64 notes

theeconomist:

KAL’s cartoon: this week, a sculpture.

theeconomist:

KAL’s cartoon: this week, a sculpture.

31st May 2012

Photoset reblogged from little rich girl with 14,066 notes

hemingerald:

“They were careless people - they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.”

31st May 2012

Photo reblogged from Newsweek with 180 notes

newsweek:

This is a poster for the children’s book, “All About Poop,” which is a few hundred dollars short of actually happening on Kickstarter. If you believe in poop, and you believe in the kids, go check it out. This poster is totally going on our Christmas poop list.

newsweek:

This is a poster for the children’s book, “All About Poop,” which is a few hundred dollars short of actually happening on Kickstarter. If you believe in poop, and you believe in the kids, go check it out. This poster is totally going on our Christmas poop list.